The Moveable Feast of Collage - Art of RetroCollage | Art of RetroCollage

The Moveable Feast of Collage

If you are lucky enough to have lived in as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast. —Ernest Hemingway

The Moveable Feast (2013). Digital collage created & copyright © by Eric Edelman. All rights reserved.

The (2013). Digital collage created & copyright © by Eric Edelman. All rights reserved.

Hemingway described Paris as a “moveable feast”: a source of lifelong spiritual nourishment. Likewise, anything that sustains the spirit throughout life may be looked upon as a moveable feast. That which brings joy, that which moves us to surpass ourselves, that which grows our lives beyond their bounds; that is a limitless moveable feast.

(All artwork, descriptions, & other text [except for quotations] created & copyright © by Eric Edelman. All rights reserved.)

{ 52 comments }

  • Christine M January 22, 2013, 12:04 pm

    I don’t get it…

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 5:48 pm

      It’s interesting: when these collages start to come into form, I don’t always understand them either (and that often applies to the writing that accompanies them as well). But over time, I’ve learned to become comfortable with not understanding them–and also to have faith that eventually I’ll get their meaning. Thanks for your comment, Christine.

      Reply
      • Sukhmandir Kaur January 22, 2013, 7:42 pm

        I lost my original comment I think, but it was about how I’ve never understood one of my more memorable drawings, I still have somewhere… It seems as though it could be deciphered like a dream ,,, but in over 30 years hasn’t given me an answer, even though I know what I associate it with, but perhaps it’s OK just to express what comes up for the sake of expression like humming a tune….. and just let it be intriguing without figuring it out.

        Reply
        • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 9:26 pm

          No, you didn’t lose your original comment. I’ve also posted it here. As I wrote earlier, it has benefited me tremendously to learn to be comfortable with ambiguity and with not understanding the meaning of something I’ve done. So I do agree with the notion that it’s appropriate to express something without necessarily understanding it.

          Sometimes a meaning surfaces for something done in the past, sometimes not; other times, the meaning of an image gets clarified by someone else’s interpretation or explanation. To use a rather insipid but fitting modern phrase, “It’s all good.” And indeed it is. I feel strongly that when it is given to us to play a part in creating something (something constructive and serving a good purpose), it’s an obligation we can’t very well refuse–regardless of our understanding or lack thereof. Creative activity is a gift. Understanding is also a gift, however infrequently it may come to me. I’m thankful for whatever gifts I do receive.

          Thanks for your thoughtful comment and your kind words!

          Reply
  • stevebethere January 22, 2013, 1:25 pm

    Oh I love it heheh!

    Have a fantabulosa week ;-)

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 1:32 pm

      Thanks very much Steve…and a maravillosa semana to you as well!

      Reply
  • Robin from Israel January 22, 2013, 1:38 pm

    Hemingway most certainly got it right. There’s no city on earth that is quite like Paris.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 1:46 pm

      True…though I fear that the Paris of his youth—and mine—is gone forever, never to return. Thanks for your visit and your thoughtful comment, Robin.

      Reply
  • self sagacity January 22, 2013, 2:08 pm

    the image is thought provoking as always.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 2:23 pm

      Thanks very much for your visit and your kind comment!

      Reply
  • Judy Haughton-James January 22, 2013, 4:25 pm

    Cool collage. Thanks for hosting Eric. Happy WW!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 5:44 pm

      Thanks for your visit and your kind comment, Judy! It’s always a pleasure to host you. Have a great WW!

      Reply
  • Alissa Apel January 22, 2013, 5:15 pm

    I’d love to go to Paris.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 5:42 pm

      It is special. I’d recommend that, if you can manage it, you go as soon as you can…before Paris has become entirely homogenized, and exactly the same as any other megalopolis. Thanks for your comment, Alissa.

      Reply
  • April - My Bizarre Family January 22, 2013, 5:52 pm

    Neato! Happy WW!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 6:56 pm

      Thanks very much, April!

      Reply
  • Janet@TheCatOnMyHead January 22, 2013, 6:26 pm

    I studied in Paris the summer of ’65 and have been trying to get back ever since.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 6:55 pm

      I lived and studied in Paris for a year beginning in late 1987…it had an atmosphere much different then from what it has now; undoubtedly also much different then from what it had been in summer 1965. Thanks for your reminiscence!

      Reply
  • Sukhmandir Kaur January 22, 2013, 7:37 pm

    I love this! Really, it’s like a dream. Brings to mind a scribble I did one long ago…

    Reply
  • AVCr8teur January 22, 2013, 7:56 pm

    Hemingway has a way with words and you have a way with collages. Thanks for the linky.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 9:01 pm

      Thanks very much…I appreciate your kind words!

      Reply
  • Joyce January 22, 2013, 9:02 pm Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 10:18 pm

      Thanks, Joyce!

      Reply
  • veronica lee January 22, 2013, 11:07 pm

    I’d love to go to Paris someday – it’s on my bucket list.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 22, 2013, 11:11 pm

      Go soon! Sooner than later, because Paris is changing… You won’t regret going if you go now. Thanks for your comment, Veronica!

      Reply
  • Jackie January 22, 2013, 11:55 pm

    I know I am an odd ball. My daughter who teaches 19th and 20th century literature keeps reminding me because I don’t like Hemingway. I’m either the only person on the planet that doesn’t or the only one that will admit it!

    Happy WW! :-)

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 3:53 am

      Thanks for your visit and your comment, Jackie. I really don’t agree with your daughter’s statement. Whether you enjoy Hemingway or not is purely a matter of your individual taste. Since all of us have different tastes in everything (not just literature), it would be highly surprising if there weren’t large numbers of people who don’t care for Hemingway’s writing at all. My own philosophy on taste in literature is taken from another famous twentieth-century writer, the Argentinian Jorge Luis Borges; he is reported to have told some of his friends that it only made sense to read the works of authors they truly enjoyed, that it was a sin against both themselves and the authors of books they didn’t enjoy, to force themselves to read the works of those authors. And (I do hope this reassures you!) I’ve known several people who haven’t enjoyed Hemingway’s work either.

      Have a great WW!

      Reply
  • ❤ Julie Maloney ❤ (@Momspective) January 22, 2013, 11:58 pm

    Great shot!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 3:54 am

      Thank you very much, Julie!

      Reply
  • Gattina January 23, 2013, 1:51 am

    Very creative !

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 3:55 am

      Thanks very much, Gattina!

      Reply
  • Christy Ann January 23, 2013, 2:13 am

    I see the comments about understanding your work and I have to agree. I have found that the best creative work in any medium is open to interpretation; it brings about unique thoughts, feelings, and memories in each individual based on their own minds and experiences. This is what makes art so amazing!!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 3:58 am

      Thanks very much for your visit and your thoughtful comment, Christy Ann. Yes, that is one of the great and joyous potentials of art: that it can start a dialogue between the artist and viewer–a dialogue to which each brings fresh perceptions, reactions, and feelings that can creatively inspire both, and keep the process of creation rolling.

      Reply
  • LuAnn Braley January 23, 2013, 2:42 am

    New follower from Wordless Wednesday at Create With Joy.

    I see collages as layered objects…as they were created in layers, they can be best understood in layers, after several visits.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 4:05 am

      Thanks very much for your visit and your very perceptive comment, Luann, and welcome to Art of RetroCollage!

      That’s very true. Using layers is exactly how I and many others create collages, and repeated viewing of the same collage over time can bring out new insights and feelings about the work. I’ve seen this myself, when looking at collages I’d worked on years before.

      Reply
  • Nizam January 23, 2013, 4:32 am

    This is art.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 12:49 pm

      Thank you very much!

      Reply
  • Daryl January 23, 2013, 7:35 am

    an apt description

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 12:36 pm

      Thanks very much, Daryl!

      Reply
  • Rosey January 23, 2013, 10:53 am

    We visited the city and were told we sat where he sat, which was a neat thing for my husband because Hemmingway is one of his absolute favorite authors. Your collage is great!

    Reply
  • Rosey January 23, 2013, 11:19 am

    I can add my link but not comment on Google Chrome. I’m going to try here in Firefox.
    I like this collage quite a bit! And I like the subject matter. Hubby and I went to the city and were told we sat in the same place Hemmingway often did. Hubby is a huge fan, so he thought that was more than a little neat.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 23, 2013, 12:42 pm

      Thanks very much for your visit and your comment, Rosey! I really appreciate your kind words.

      Reply
  • nan January 23, 2013, 1:26 pm

    thank you for hosting.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 24, 2013, 2:18 am

      You’re very welcome.

      Reply
  • Leovi January 24, 2013, 3:10 am

    Yes, it’s very nice, I love this fun composition.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 24, 2013, 12:39 pm

      Thank you very much, Leovi!

      Reply
  • Mary January 25, 2013, 1:06 am

    I love this collage. When I visited the Louvre 4 years ago, I found out that the French absolutely love to stand and discuss art work instead of just looking at it and running to the next display. So, the people in front at the bar certainly look “French” to me. But I also like the smirk on the man’s face in the background. (The one with the strings on his ears!) Your collages generally make me smile and I enjoy just absorbing their content. Very nice Eric!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 25, 2013, 9:10 pm

      Thank you very much, Mary. I really appreciate your kind words!

      Reply
  • kristi January 25, 2013, 6:01 am

    Not sure if my comment went through Eric. But I enjoyed the artwork! I went to Paris as a Junior in high school. Also, I love the concept of a movable feast!

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 25, 2013, 11:57 pm

      Thanks, Kristi! I’m glad you liked the artwork and I appreciate your kind comment. Yes, Hemingway’s reinterpretation of the moveable feast concept was brilliant, and is still the way I prefer to define it.

      Reply
  • Kiks January 29, 2013, 3:24 am

    Cool and definitely thought provoking.

    Reply
    • Eric Edelman January 29, 2013, 1:42 pm

      Thanks very much!

      Reply

{ 52 comments… add one }

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